Attalea? Adalia? An-TA-Li-ya!
Attalea — in 159 BC, the city of Attalea was founded by king Attalus II of Pergamos. Adaliya — the so-called city of the Byzantines, who brought back still standing…

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4 elements of rest
WATER. Cotton castle and thalassotherapy Thermal springs of the Turkish resort Pamukkale — a unique phenomenon of nature, which has no analogues in the world. The waters of the hot…

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Attalea? Adalia? An-TA-Li-ya!
Attalea — in 159 BC, the city of Attalea was founded by king Attalus II of Pergamos. Adaliya — the so-called city of the Byzantines, who brought back still standing…

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Milk coast
Going for miracles in distant countries, we often forget that they are very close to us. One of these unique places called Pamukkale is in Turkey. Arriving there, tourists get…

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The Treasure Of Bodrum

At the entrance to Bodrum from the road winding along the slopes of the mountains, a fascinating panorama opens up: snow-white houses buried in the greenery, the spires of yachts sticking up and the fortification proudly towering on the Cape. This is a symbol of Bodrum — the castle of St. Peter’s Hard fate If not for one of the wonders of the ancient world — mausoleum of mausoleum, we would not have had the opportunity today to admire the castle of St. Peter. Crusader knights around the XIV century cheerfully completed what before them could not make a devastating earthquake — dismantled the mausoleum almost to the ground to use it as a building material in the construction of the fortress. Visual evidence of the barbaric treatment of the mausoleum in the form of plates, pieces of columns and sculptures are still embedded in the fortification wall of the castle. For his reckless act knights paid his already not very good reputation. For a century, the castle of St. Peter (Bodrum Kalesi) was one of the main fortifications Of the order of the gospitelers and several times was attacked by the Ottoman Empire. One of the inscriptions preserved on the wall of the castle says: “Protect us, Lord, while we are on duty. Keep us safe while we sleep. Unless the Lord protects a city, in vain are his keepers on guard.” Really, the guardians stood in vain, because the ancient post worked poorly, and the prayers of the knights never reached the addressee: 29 June 1522 Sultan Suleiman attacked the headquarters of the Order in Rhodes. The knights could not stand the five-month siege and surrendered, without a fight handing over to the possession of the Sultan 13 of their castles, including the castle of St. Peter. Since then, the citadel began to acquire Muslim features. The chapel underwent the first alteration — it was turned into a mosque, having attached to it a minaret. It together with several fortress towers was destroyed by the French during the First world war, rebuilt in the XX century and now stands out against the chapel lighter and smoother masonry. During the years of its existence, the castle managed to visit the Turkish military base, prison and even a public bath. It was not forgotten like the mausoleum of Mausolus, and survived only because there were always enough military, prisoners and clean citizens in the city. In the XIX century the castle aroused great interest among the British. At first the British Ambassador in Constantinople Stratford canning have taken out 12 marble reliefs depicting the battle between Greeks and Amazons, and after 10 years, a member of the British Museum, Charles Newton, who conducted excavations on the castle grounds, bought stone sculptures of lions and leopard. All of them are now kept in the British Museum. New status the Fate of St. Peter’s castle changed dramatically in the late 50s of the XX century. The state first allocated money for its restoration, and a few years later gave it the status of a Museum. On the one hand in its walls collected artifacts that miraculously managed to survive after the destruction of the mausoleum of the mausoleum, as well as objects that illustrate the life of the knights. But the present pride of the castle is the Museum of underwater archeology, which exhibits items found at shipwrecks in the Aegean sea. At the entrance to the castle we are greeted by a modern statue of Herodotus, Artemis, and of the Satrap Mausolus. Not far from them is another stone figure — an unknown Roman soldier. Its peculiarity is that it has no head, and it stands next to a low curb. Ancient sculptors and did not expect that after a few centuries, tourists will be photographed with their creation, standing on the curb and put instead of the missing body part of his head. In the fortress walls are clearly visible “patches” of the mausoleum, and along the paths inside are placed “hemp” antique columns. On the upper yard under a canopy hang the scheme of the territory and the black-and-white photo dated 1964. It depicts a crowd of people lined up in front of the dilapidated walls of the castle. This photo was taken before the reconstruction, and thanks to it we were able to appreciate the changes that have occurred here for half a century. On the upper tier of the citadel is now a blooming garden, which roam freely peacocks (among them there is one completely white) and partridges. The castle Museum is thematically divided into several exhibition areas, each of which is interesting in its own way, so their inspection requires a lot of time. So if you’ve come here, get ready to spend at least half a day here — the exposure is worth it. Start with a fascinating view that opens from the height of the castle walls: the Bay lying at your feet, has witnessed more than one major battle and other historical events. Two watchtowers — English and German — furnished in the style of the two countries. Here you can touch the history — look out the narrow window from which the knights watched the attack of enemies, or touch the walls, in some places dotted with strange symbols and messages. The scale of the exposure of objects found on the seabed, it is difficult to describe in words. Here, for example, the whole room (Glass Hall) is dedicated only to glass. It contains glass objects from various ancient cities of the region, the oldest of them date back to the XIV century. In a dark room with black walls, tiny glass jars and perfume bottles, medicine bottles and ornate water lilies stand on illuminated display cases. All these tiny things as if made in the country of Lilliputians! Another hall — Uluburun Ship Wreck Hall — is a real find for those who read adventure novels in their childhood. In it, visitors can admire the giant layout of the ship “in the section”, large and small pitchers and many other items sometimes unclear purpose. And probably the most popular room of the Museum is the one where the treasures from the seabed are exhibited. The crowds of tourists stand in awe of her display cases, decorated with precious stones, gold and silver pendants, earrings and bracelets. Here everyone feels like a child, and in the memory of legends about the brave robbers, fast pirate frigates and incredible sea adventures.

Revived myth
The trip to Troy is remarkable in that it will inevitably remind of itself in all the most famous museums of the world. In the "Prado" in Madrid, where the…

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Kusadasi (Turkey) - emerald tear of the Aegean coast
Tourists who plan to go to a foreign beach resort with young children, it is recommended to pay attention to the Aegean coast of Turkey, Kusadasi resort. This region is…

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Istanbul. Eyes fascination…
I want to tell the world about the most beautiful city on earth! I must say that I have seen a few of them, but still sincerely believe that Istanbul…

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Alanya: imagine yourself as a pirate or Cleopatra!
Imagine a place with heavenly beaches, warm climate, beautiful scenery, where pirates "nested" and took a bath one of the most famous Queens in the world. It may seem that…

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